On CrossFit and Risk

The amazing Julie Foucher’s thoughts on Crossfit and risk. Great insight!

Comfort in the Uncomfortable

Growing up, my mom would often tell me “When I was ten, I broke my ankle taking a giant step in the backyard playing a game of SPUD. Heck, if you can break your ankle taking a giant step, you might as well go out and do something more fun.” Fortunately, she has supported me through many such fun experiences over the years. But, like most parents, she has also instilled in me the fact that there is a certain amount of risk associated with doing just about anything in life. The responsibility falls on each one of us to evaluate and decide how much risk we are willing to take on in order to reap the potential rewards of our actions.

A "risk taker" from a young age, thanks to Mom A “risk taker” from a young age, thanks to Mom

I have become increasingly familiar with the concept of balancing risks and benefits through my medical training. Though…

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One thought on “On CrossFit and Risk

  1. I like the article. Despite being a wuss, I’ve been involved in several “risky” sports over the years–dirt bike racing, women’s rugby, rally car racing (co-driving for my husband), inline skate racing–and CrossFit just doesn’t seem that risky to me. As long as you listen to your body you’ll be fine. I know of many people who have died/been severely injured riding/racing bicycles, but you don’t hear people getting worked up about the risk of biking. I think the problem for CrossFit is that, although it’s a fitness program, it’s also a sport and we get just as rabid about it as other people do about their other sports–which those who only do “fitness” activities don’t understand. Sure, CrossFit is more risky than strolling on a treadmill–but probably less risky than playing hockey or bike racing or even running marathons; and since we get so obsessed with it, we’re more likely to continue doing it and thus be fitter/healthier than those who just do “fitness” activities because “it’s good for me.”
    (whew, I guess it’s true…don’t get a CrossFitter started talking about CrossFit 🙂 )

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